On one hand, Expedia is an online travel company. On the other, we’re a partner in countless stories; honeymoons, million-dollar business deals, a child’s first trip to the beach…we make these things happen. We love travel and we want to make it easier for everyone to share our passion. Travel lets us find beauty in the unexpected places of the world, in crowded marketplaces or in the eerie morning fog of the countryside. Share the joy of travel with the world and you’ll find that the greatest voyage of your career might be with us. We’re looking for people who are just as enthusiastic as we are when it comes to travel. People who get giddy while planning a trip. People who have lists of places they want visit. And people who can’t stand making lists. We want people who recognize that technology is how we’re going to make travel simpler and more accessible. People who understand that travel isn’t about Point A and Point B. It’s about everything in between. Similarly, this company isn’t just about the end result. We need to be happy, stimulated and fulfilled. If that’s what you want too, we would love to hear from you.
A study published in 2017 found that increasing Airbnb listings in a given neighborhood by 10% leads to a 0.42% increase in rents and a 0.76% increase in house prices.[141] According to an analysis conducted in 2016, while commercial listings comprised only 10% of Airbnb's total listings in 25 largest U. S. markets for the period between June 2015 and May 2016, they constituted about a third of host revenue. In markets such as Los Angeles and Portland, Oregon, the share of revenue from commercial listings reached nearly 50%.[142]
This is a key role, where you'll be at the heart of our big push for growth in Europe, building our profile all across your territory. Leading a smart, talented team, you'll create a diverse portfolio of hotels that will allow millions of customers to get exactly the holiday they want. You'll make sure all of our hotel partners, from huge global chains, to family-run boutiques, get the most from our innovative technology, our unique breadth of global customers, and the data-based marketing solutions we can offer every single one of them.
As of January 2018, the airline has had almost sixty aircraft hull losses due to all causes since the crash of an American Airways Ford 5-AT-C Trimotor in August 1931.[81][82] Of these most were propeller driven aircraft, including three Lockheed L-188 Electra turboprop aircraft (of which one, the crash in 1959 of Flight 320, resulted in fatalities).[82] Seventeen jet aircraft have been written off due to crashes – including Flight 587 in 2001, Flight 965 in 1995, Flight 191 in 1979, Flight 1 in 1962 and two aircraft destroyed in the September 11 attacks – and other accidents (such as the Flight 383 engine failure and fire in 2016); two of these were training flights in which only the crew were killed and six resulted in no fatalities.[82] Another four jet aircraft have been written off due to incidents while they were parked between flights or while undergoing maintenance.[82]
Shortly after moving to San Francisco in October 2007, roommates and former schoolmates Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia could not afford the rent for their loft apartment. Chesky and Gebbia came up with the idea of putting an air mattress in their living room and turning it into a bed and breakfast.[16][17] The goal at first was just "to make a few bucks".[18][19] In February 2008, Nathan Blecharczyk, Chesky's former roommate, joined as the Chief Technology Officer and the third co-founder of the new venture, which they named AirBed & Breakfast.[17][20] They put together a website which offered short-term living quarters, breakfast, and a unique business networking opportunity for those who were unable to book a hotel in the saturated market.[21] The site Airbedandbreakfast.com officially launched on August 11, 2008.[22][23] The founders had their first customers in town in the summer of 2008, during the Industrial Design Conference held by Industrial Designers Society of America, where travelers had a hard time finding lodging in the city.[17][24]
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