Documentation. This project required us to operate within a tight timeline, which caused us to overlook some of the documentation process. Lacking thorough documentation created some confusion that could have been avoided. Just like with coding, documenting systems as they are created is paramount to the process. It has to be done sooner or later, and documenting throughout the creation process allows for smoother decision-making.
Los Angeles – The eighth-largest hub in terms of number of destinations and flights and American's hub for the West Coast.[21] About 16.5 million passengers fly through LAX on American every year, or about 45,000 people per day.[21] American has about 19% of the market share at LAX, making it the largest carrier at the airport.[21] LAX is American Airlines' primary Hawaiian and transpacific gateway.[21]
Airbnb has experienced a lot of growth over the years. Currently our design department consists of nearly a dozen functions and outcome teams. It became clear that we needed more systematic ways to guide and leverage our collective efforts. While we recognized these challenges within the company, I believe they are symptoms of larger software industry problems.

The rigidity can also cause drama at the airport, where it can produce uneven customer service, as agents may close out flights before connecting passengers arrive. Isom said he understands the criticism, but said in many cases keeping operational integrity helps more customers. American has 6,700 daily flights, and sometimes it’s easier to put passengers on the next one, rather than hold doors open.

Phoenix–Sky Harbor – The sixth-largest hub in terms of number of flights and destinations[18] and American's primary western hub.[19] American flies approximately 20 million passengers a year through PHX, which is about 55,000 people per day.[19] Currently American has about 46% of the market share at PHX, making it the airport's largest airline.[19]
One year later, there were 15 people working from Chesky and Gebbia's loft apartment on Rausch Street in San Francisco. To make room for employees, Brian Chesky gave up his bedroom and lived at lodging booked via the Airbnb service until the company moved into its first office space.[32][18] In April 2009, the company received $600,000 in seed money from Sequoia Capital[18] and, in November 2010, raised $7.2 million in financing from Greylock Partners and, again, from Sequoia Capital, in a Series A round, then announcing that out of 700,000 nights booked, 80% had occurred in the previous six months.[33]
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