On June 3, 2016, American Airlines sought to register their 2013 logo with the United States Copyright Office.[65] However, in October of that year, the Copyright Office ruled that the logo was ineligible for copyright protection, as it did not pass the threshold of originality.[65] American submitted multiple requests for the Copyright Office to reconsider their determination. However, on January 8, 2018, the Copyright Office made a final decision that affirmed its initial determination that American's new logo was ineligible for copyright protection and is thus in the public domain.[65][66]

As of January 2018, the airline has had almost sixty aircraft hull losses due to all causes since the crash of an American Airways Ford 5-AT-C Trimotor in August 1931.[81][82] Of these most were propeller driven aircraft, including three Lockheed L-188 Electra turboprop aircraft (of which one, the crash in 1959 of Flight 320, resulted in fatalities).[82] Seventeen jet aircraft have been written off due to crashes – including Flight 587 in 2001, Flight 965 in 1995, Flight 191 in 1979, Flight 1 in 1962 and two aircraft destroyed in the September 11 attacks – and other accidents (such as the Flight 383 engine failure and fire in 2016); two of these were training flights in which only the crew were killed and six resulted in no fatalities.[82] Another four jet aircraft have been written off due to incidents while they were parked between flights or while undergoing maintenance.[82]
American's early liveries varied widely, but a common livery was adopted in the 1930s, featuring an eagle painted on the fuselage.[67] The eagle became a symbol of the company and inspired the name of American Eagle Airlines. Propeller aircraft featured an international orange lightning bolt running down the length of the fuselage, which was replaced by a simpler orange stripe with the introduction of jets.
Airbnb is an American home rental platform based in San Francisco that lets people list, find, and rent short-term lodging in 65,000 cities and more than 191 countries across the globe. Founded in 2008 by Brian Chesky, Joe Gebbia, and Nathan Blecharczyk, it has done more than any other company to change the way people find places to stay away from home. In recent years, Airbnb has evolved its peer-to-peer model to give hosts the tech tools they need to run a seamless, sophisticated operation. More than 40% of Airbnb listings are now available via Instant Book, allowing guests to make reservations much as they would a hotel booking, and a new check-in tool automatically feeds arrival instructions to them via the app. The company has also expanded into Business Travel Ready listings, which offer travelers a designated work space, guaranteed Wi-Fi, and more. Now valued at $31 billion, the company is also helping travelers explore the world outside their rentals. In 2016, Airbnb launched Trips, a service that lures travelers out of their rentals for local tours and adventures in 20 countries and 30 cities around the globe. And in an effort to address humanitarian issues, Airbnb launched an Open Homes program in 2017 that allows hosts to offer housing to refugees, displaced travelers, and those seeking shelter after disasters. 
The Resilience of the American Vacation in Mexico: This excellent enterprise piece from Skift’s Sarah Enelow-Synder is not about airlines, though the Mexican carrier Volaris figures prominently. Holger Blankenstein, who runs the airline’s commercial team, explains why marketing to Mexican-Americans is different from targeting vacationers. “In a Mexican-origin family, the son or daughter are the ones who buy the flight ticket for the parents,” he said. “How the family gets to know Volaris and the brand is passed down from generation to generation.”
Designers were also excited about the system. It enables product reviews to focus on the actual concepts and experiences of a design, rather than padding, colors and type choices. The DLS provides us with a shared understanding of our visual style, and streamlines contributions to a single system. This system also enables all of us to prototype and experiment with ideas in high fidelity faster and at a lower cost.
AAdvantage is the frequent flyer program for American Airlines. It was launched on May 1, 1981, and it remains the largest frequent flyer program with over 67 million members as of 2011. Miles accumulated in the program allow members to redeem tickets, upgrade service class, or obtain free or discounted car rentals, hotel stays, merchandise, or other products and services through partners. The most active members, based on the amount and price of travel booked, are designated AAdvantage Gold, AAdvantage Platinum, AAdvantage Platinum Pro, and AAdvantage Executive Platinum elite members, with privileges such as separate check-in, priority upgrade and standby processing, or free upgrades. They also receive similar privileges from AA's partner airlines, particularly those in oneworld.[48]
Guests can search for lodging using filters such as lodging type, dates, location, and price. Before booking, users must provide personal and payment information. Some hosts also require a scan of a government-issued identification before accepting a reservation.[4] The company also provides travel guides, entitled "Neighborhoods", which provide details about staying in specific neighborhoods in various major cities.[5][6]
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