Simply browse through the local hotels, compare rates, and book the one that best suits your travel preferences and price range. We feature a variety of accommodations—from places featuring complimentary breakfasts to lodging with 24-hour concierge service. Our assortment also includes user reviews, so you can receive the inside scoop on the best places to stay in town. And just because you’re not booking in advance doesn’t mean your reservations should cost you and an arm and a leg.
As of January 2018, the airline has had almost sixty aircraft hull losses due to all causes since the crash of an American Airways Ford 5-AT-C Trimotor in August 1931.[81][82] Of these most were propeller driven aircraft, including three Lockheed L-188 Electra turboprop aircraft (of which one, the crash in 1959 of Flight 320, resulted in fatalities).[82] Seventeen jet aircraft have been written off due to crashes – including Flight 587 in 2001, Flight 965 in 1995, Flight 191 in 1979, Flight 1 in 1962 and two aircraft destroyed in the September 11 attacks – and other accidents (such as the Flight 383 engine failure and fire in 2016); two of these were training flights in which only the crew were killed and six resulted in no fatalities.[82] Another four jet aircraft have been written off due to incidents while they were parked between flights or while undergoing maintenance.[82]
American operates out of ten hubs located in Dallas/Fort Worth, Charlotte, Chicago–O'Hare, Philadelphia, Miami, Phoenix–Sky Harbor, Washington–National, Los Angeles, New York–JFK, and New York–LaGuardia. American operates its primary maintenance base at Tulsa International Airport in addition to the maintenance locations located at its hubs. Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport is American Airlines’ largest passenger carrying hub, handling 51.1 million passengers annually with an average of 140,000 passengers daily. As of 2017, the company employs over 122,000 people.[7] Through the airline's parent company, American Airlines Group, it is publicly traded under NASDAQ: AAL with a market capitalization of about $25 billion as of 2017, and included in the S&P 500 index.[8]
Traditionally, many style guides define components as atomic components, which are then used to build more complex molecules. In theory, this works well to create coherent and flexible systems. In practice, however, what often happens is that these re-usable atoms are used many different ways, allowing all kinds of molecules to be created. Again, this opens the door for all kinds of disjointed experiences and makes the system harder to maintain.

While creating these components, we collected them in a master file called the library, which we referred to throughout the design process. After a week or two we began to see huge leaps in productivity by using the library when iterating on designs. One day, while putting together a last-minute prototype, our team was able to create nearly 50 screens within just a few hours by using the framework our library provided.


Before it was headquartered in Texas, American Airlines was headquartered at 633 Third Avenue in the Murray Hill area of Midtown Manhattan, New York City.[55][56] In 1979, American moved its headquarters to a site at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, which affected up to 1,300 jobs. Mayor of New York City Ed Koch described the move as a "betrayal" of New York City.[57] American moved to two leased office buildings in Grand Prairie, Texas.[58] On January 17, 1983, the airline finished moving into a $150 million ($369,000,000 when adjusted for inflation), 550,000-square-foot (51,000 m2) facility in Fort Worth; $147 million (about $361,000,000 when adjusted for inflation) in Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport bonds financed the headquarters. The airline began leasing the facility from the airport, which owns the facility.[58]

In December 2010, listings for AMR Corporation, the parent company of American Airlines and American Eagle Airlines, were deleted from Expedia's site. The decision resulted from a dispute over the degree of access to the site's customers.[6] AMR reversed its decision in April 2011, allowing tickets to once again be sold through the aggregate site.[7]
To help fund the site, the founders created special edition breakfast cereals, with presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain as the inspiration for "Obama O's" and "Cap'n McCains".[25] In two months, 800 boxes of cereal were sold at $40 each, which generated more than $30,000 for the company's incubation.[26][27] It also got the company noticed by computer programmer Paul Graham, who invited the founders to the January 2009 winter training session of his startup incubator, Y Combinator, which provided them with training and $20,000 in funding in exchange for a small interest in the company.[18][28][29] With the website already built, they used the $20,000 Y-Combinator investment to fly to New York City to meet users and promote the site.[30] They returned to San Francisco with a profitable business model to present to West Coast investors. By March 2009, the site had 10,000 users and 2,500 listings.[29]
×