Airbnb features a review system in which guests and hosts can rate each other after a stay. Hosts and guests are unable to see reviews until both have submitted a review or until the window to review has closed, a system which aims to improve accuracy and objectivity by removing fears that users will receive a negative review in retaliation if they write one. However, the truthfulness and impartiality of reviews may be adversely affected by concerns of future stays because prospective hosts may refuse to host a user who generally leaves negative reviews. In addition, the company's policy requires users to forego anonymity, which may also detract from users' willingness to leave negative reviews. These factors may damage the objectivity of the review system.[126][127][128][129]
American's economy plus product (not to be confused with premium economy), Main Cabin Extra, is available on most of the mainline fleet and American Eagle regional aircraft with more than 50 seats. Exceptions include a majority of former US Airways aircraft (as of May 2014), US Airways Express regional aircraft, and a handful of 777-200ERs that have yet to be retrofitted. Seats range from 17.2–19.5 inches (44–47 cm) in width and have 34–38 inches (86–97 cm) of pitch, which is 5–6 more inches of pitch offered in regular economy seating.[38] American retained Main Cabin Extra when the new Premium Economy product entered service in late 2016.[40]
Aer Lingus Taps New CEO From Within Parent IAG: Aer Lingus is no longer a stand-alone airline, so it makes sense that its CEO, Stephen Kavanagh, who joined the company in 1988, is stepping down. Newish owner International Airlines Group, owner of Iberia and British Airways, is putting its own man in charge. Skift Europe Editor Patrick Whyte has the story.

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Guests can search for lodging using filters such as lodging type, dates, location, and price. Before booking, users must provide personal and payment information. Some hosts also require a scan of a government-issued identification before accepting a reservation.[4] The company also provides travel guides, entitled "Neighborhoods", which provide details about staying in specific neighborhoods in various major cities.[5][6]
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